By Davis Taylor

Photo by Mark Raker

Music is an expression of what life is like on earth—mysterious, paradoxical, beautiful, dark, and weird—it’s a unique way to express what is otherwise inexplicable via other mediums. Music can reveal an answer to some deep question that was otherwise unsatisfied by conventional modes of thought. A concern with weirdness translated into music often evokes the same primal archetypal scream of drumming and dancing to the Saharan stars a few thousand years ago. It can be celebratory and humorous, dry and emotional, and often political and representative of our countless micro cultures. In any case a musician represents a unique perspective of existence. A single song is just a mere sentence within an endless conversation concerning that perspective, which is why music is best understood live and in context. Nonetheless, my daily routine would be colorless without the plethora of packaged music available to everyone these days. And for that I am grateful.

Here’s a snapshot of music that’s been hanging around my musical consciousness recently:

“Bad Vibrations” by The Black Angels

Neo-Psych band out of Austin—hard to pick just one from this Easter basket of sultry psychedelic rock…it sounds like hot stew on a summer day.

“Out In The Country” by Natural Child

Laurel Canyon meets Punkish Southern Rock in this Trio from Nashville.

“County Line” by Susto

Country Western Alt Rock out of Charleston led by Justin Osborne

“Guitar In My Hands” by The Marcus King Band

Marcus King is the real deal.

“High Is Not The Top” by Chris Robinson Brotherhood 

Diggin CRB more and more– they’ve certainly found a unique sound and are here to stay.

“What it Means” by Drive-By Truckers

Can’t get more political than this, salty southerners writing songs about racist cops.

“Second Song” by Assembly of Dust

If only they toured…led by Reid Genauer (also Strangefolk) they seamlessly blend folksy, intelligent songwriting with laid back melodic, Dead-like musicianship.

“No Cryin’ Now” by Michael Houser

Choice cut from Mikey Houser’s overlooked posthumous solo release Sandbox.

“Restless Wind” by Emmit-Nershi Band

Solid collaboration between two titans of jamgrass.

“Can’t Complain” by Todd Snider

Now known as co-leader of Hard Working Americans, Todd Snider’s Western-folk ala John Prine shouldn’t be ignored.

Written by mitchp8910

I like to rock and roll.

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